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372 result(s) for "Mackenzie, Debora"
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COVID-19 : the pandemic that never should have happened and how to stop the next one
In a gripping, accessible narrative, a veteran science journalist lays out the shocking story of how the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic happened and how to make sure this never happens again.
COVID-19 : the pandemic that never should have happened, and how to stop the next one
Over the last 30 years, we learned every lesson needed to stop this coronavirus outbreak in its tracks. We heeded almost none of them. The result is a pandemic on a scale never before seen in our lifetimes. Here, science journalist Debora MacKenzie lays out the full story of how and why it happened: the previous viruses that should have prepared us, the shocking public health failures that paved the way, the failure to contain the outbreak, and most importantly, what we must do to stop this happening again. Offering a compelling history of the most significant recent outbreaks, including SARS, MERS, H1N1, Zika, and Ebola, MacKenzie outlines the lessons we failed to learn from each past crisis. But looking forward, she makes a bold, optimistic argument : this pandemic might finally galvanize the world to take viruses seriously. No one has yet brought together our knowledge of Covid-19 in a comprehensive, informative, and accessible way. But that story can already be told, and Debora MacKenzie's urgent telling is required reading for these times and beyond. Fighting this pandemic and preventing the next one will take political action of all kinds, globally, from governments, the scientific community, and individuals -- and if we act now, it is possible.
ESWI pandemic preparedness summit: where science and policy meet
Fig. 2 The majority of emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic, and their frequency is increasing Research conducted to determine the natural reservoir of viruses discovered that bats are reservoirs for more than ten virus families, including a high proportion of coronaviruses, some of which have a high risk of jumping to other species. [...]all human coronaviruses have an animal origin; mostly bats and rodents. [...]certain pre-emptive strategies are needed, such as (in surveillance and precaution) pathogen discovery, genomics characterisation, mutation & evolutionary analysis, epidemiology testing, and predictive modelling; or (in pathogen biology) looking at structure & function, entry & replication mechanisms, infection models, pathogenesis, and cross-species risk assessment; and (countermeasures) development of diagnostic methods, antivirals & antibodies, and vaccines. Dr. Wolfgang Philipp, HERA, Belgium HERA – the Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Authority – was created during the current pandemic with a strong legal basis for coordination and response at the EU level to health threats.
How Life Works — why there’s more to it all than DNA
In 1953, Watson and Crick, famed publishers of its double helix structure, called it the secret of life — as though “life itself somehow inheres in the DNA molecule”, Ball complains, like a latter-day soul. Biology’s crusade to “find the gene” for traits from aggression to cancer has so often failed possibly because it was the wrong question: the real controls can be way above genes in the hierarchy from cell to organism. How Life Works: A User’s Guide to the New Biology by Philip Ball, Picador £22, 560 pages Join our online book group on Facebook atFT Books Caféand subscribe to our podcastLife & Artwherever you listen Debora Mackenzie
WORLD'S MAMMALS ARE IN CRISIS, RED LIST REVEALS
\"We have identified the most important threats and the species most likely to go extinct if we continue as we are now: 188 species are critically endangered, of which 29 are possibly extinct,\" he says. \"I hope this assessment will be seen as a call to action.\" The rest are not out of the woods. Six per cent of all mammal species are \"near threatened\", having lost large parts of their ranges, such as the brown bear. Half of all species for which the scientists have data have shrinking populations, including a fifth of species classed as \"of least concern\" - meaning things will just get worse. Only 5% are increasing, like the European bison. In south and southeast Asia, 80% of primates are threatened. Worldwide the bigger mammals are the most threatened. They may be what conservationists call \"charismatic megafauna\", but they also make a larger target for hunters.